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Dangerous Golf For Androids Review

Dangerous Golf Review

Demanding equal parts finesse and intuition, golf is a sport few will ever master. A poor swing here, a bad lie there, and even the most passionate golfer can see their enjoyable pastime turned into an exercise in anger management. Dangerous Golf, on the other hand, eschews precision in favor of chaos. Like a drunken afternoon at the driving range, hitting a golf ball in Dangerous Golf is about expressing power, and nothing like actual golf. Your priority is to smash into as many objects as possible in everyday environments like bathrooms, kitchens, and fancy estates. It’s a diabolical fantasy brought to life, but it’s not half as fun as it sounds.

Across four countries and numerous locales, you will hurtle golf balls into objects including fine dining ware, pianos, priceless works of art, and–why not–urinals. Don’t worry about choosing an appropriate club or timing your swing just right. Simply aim the camera, press a button, and let the catharsis of destruction sink in. When you break enough items in a level, you can execute a follow-up Smashbreaker shot, which allows you to manually steer a bouncy, flaming wrecking ball, plowing through props and racking-up score multipliers until your timer runs out.

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Dangerous Golf Review

Wrapping your head around the physics of a bouncing golf ball is easier said than done, especially when the game’s camera is obscured by flying pieces of broken objects. Once your Smashbreaker shot is powered up, you have to use both the left stick and the camera to control the ball, as well as two shoulder buttons to dictate how high or low the ball bounces. Most of the time, you can sort of steer the ball the way you want to, but it usually feels like you’re trying to steer a ship with broken equipment, praying it reacts the way you want it to and struggling to correct it when it doesn’t.

You eventually have to putt the ball into a hole, but if there’s an unobstructed path (one devoid of unbreakable objects), you can just push forward on the analog stick and the ball will zip right in, smashing through smaller debris along the way. But if higher scores and rankings are what you seek, you may decide to bounce your ball off of walls or hit it into the air and attempt to drop it in the hole for an added bonus–sometimes you’re left with no other option.

There are rare levels filled with dozens of holes, where putting is your only objective. With a limited amount of balls in hand, you need make sure your shots are true–or at least pray they are lucky–in order to avoid running out while frantically taking aim at targets near and far. Pure putting levels lack the destruction found in standard outings, but they stand out as the best Dangerous Golf has to offer. In these moments, your goal is clear, and more importantly, your controls are intuitive.

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Dangerous Golf Review

Gallery image 1Gallery image 2Gallery image 3Gallery image 4Gallery image 5Gallery image 6Gallery image 7Gallery image 8Gallery image 9Gallery image 10 The oddball nature of Dangerous Golf is momentarily enjoyable, but apathy quickly sets in as you proceed to smash familiar objects level after level, resulting in all too familiar chaos. The game attempts to liven up your experience by introducing gimmicks like bombs, and showering you with loud graphics and sound effects. But all of this does very little to make the experience appealing in the long run. It’s like a comedian who shouts mediocre jokes–being loud doesn’t make the material any better.

With 100 levels and far fewer unique locations, Dangerous Golf is best enjoyed in small bursts lest you grow bored of the repeated use of familiar maps. However, any amount of time in the game can prove frustrating due to the burden of long load times, especially when you get to the more complex missions. In later levels, you’re still smashing objects like you always have, but you ultimately have to learn to avoid hazards and direct your ball on a particular path in order to hit specific objects to earn enough points for a medal. When precision fails, you will naturally restart the level.

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Dangerous Golf Review

This process becomes unbearable–it seems the game is completely reloading the level–and you have to stare at the same loading screen every single time. To make matters worse, the loading screen is just an image of the controller with button descriptions. Buried in the corner are little hints–the only attempt the game makes to explain its nuanced scoring and control systems.

Dangerous Golf is a game you want to love, but it becomes increasingly difficult as you go: the unintuitive controls stop being cute and begin to become an annoyance; the objects you smash, which for a moment inspired joy, become an afterthought. Wacky games have a place in gaming, but a game like Dangerous Golf needs more than boisterous effects and odd scenarios to sustain its allure.

See more: Knock knock Jokes

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Become A Piano Pro With Flowkey On The App Store

Become a Piano Pro with flowkey

There are tons of Android apps and games available that will help you learn a new skill or hobby. While most of them won’t replace in-person instruction, it’s still a fantastic way to learn at home or on the go.

flowkey: Learn Piano is an incredible music app that teaches you how to play piano using a real piano or keyboard. The app provides real-time feedback without the cumbersome use of cords or expensive software.

Concept and Functionality

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flowkey is the perfect combination

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flowkey: Learn Piano, by Flowkey, certainly isn’t the first app of its kind, but it is definitely one of the most successful. The developers have created a wonderful feature-rich environment that encourages users to press on and practice their skills. Unlike most teaching apps, flowkey’s musical repertoire expands far beyond classic titles like “Twinkle Twinkle Little Star”. You can learn and practice popular songs by artists like Jason Mraz and Bob Dylan. This is awesome for people who want to learn how to play songs they already know and love.

When it comes to navigation, flowkey is the perfect combination of functionality and visual appeal. You can easily find everything you’re looking for in just a few taps.

As I mentioned above, the coolest thing about flowkey is the fact that you can play along with an instrument you already own. Essentially is like having an instructor right next to you, providing instantaneous feedback and tips on how to improve your technique.

Features

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Become a Piano Pro with flowkey

flowkey is packed with many features that truly make it an outstanding educational app. For example, you can watch video tutorials and see sheet music right on the screen. You can also save your favorite songs for easy access, making it a breeze to keep practicing. There are many special features, as well, including the ability to slow songs down. This is perfect for mastering difficult chords because you can practice at your own pace.

Value

flowkey can be downloaded from Google Play for free, but there is a monthly subscription fee for the premium version of the app. As mentioned on the app’s store page, “A one-month subscription is $19.99, a three months’ subscription is $38.99 and a yearly subscription is $119.99.”

Overall, I don’t think the premium subscription is enough to deter serious users. According to Angie’s List, “On average, piano lessons can cost between $30 and $60 per hour.” It’s pretty easy to see how flowkey can pay for itself in no time at all. If you’re serious about learning how to play piano, we think flowkey is an app you simply can’t pass up. It is highly recommended and we encourage you to give it a try even if you don’t plan on taking advantage of the premium subscription.

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Android L vs Android M preview: What new features will you get on?

ANDROID L VS ANDROID M PREVIEW At Google I/O 2015, the internet giant predictably gave us our first look at the next version of Android, its mobile operating system for smartphones and tablets. Android 5.0 Lollipopupdates are still rolling out but here’s a look at what Android M will bring in terms of new features. Here’s our Android L vs Android M preview. Note: Before we launch into the comparison, it’s worth noting that this is the Android M Developer Preview (which we’re runing on the Nexus 6) so the new operating system is still very much a work in progress and will change by the time it launches properly. Therefore this article is something of a preview and we’ll update it when Android M is fully launched. See also: Android M vs iOS 9 comparison.

Android M screenshots

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ANDROID L VS ANDROID M: LOOK AND FEEL

We’re not going to go crazy with side-by-side screenshots of Android L and Android M here since Google has pretty much kept things the same. Lollipop was the version with something of an overhaul of the interface and Android M keeps the Material Design.

There are a few tweaks though such as a microphone icon at the bottom-left of the lockscreen instead of the phone (for the dialler) so you can quickly conduct a voice search or command. The app menu (or app draw) now displays vertically (as does the widgets drawer) with apps split into alphabetical groups – you can use the scroll bar at the side to quickly navigate to a particular letter. Plus there’s a new bar at the top which shows your four most recently used apps. Smaller changes include two fields for memory management so you can see average and maximum amount of RAM an app has used. SD cards can also be formatted to appear as internal storage which will keep things nice and neat.

Unfortunately the Quick Settings can’t be rearranged as standard but there is a new addition in the form of do not disturb (DND). You can edit them with the device in Developer Mode switched on and the SystemUI Tuner also switched on.

ANDROID L VS ANDROID M: ANDROID PAY

To compete with Apple Pay and Samsung Pay, Google has announced Android Pay for Android M. It will let you pay for things (at participating stores) with your phone without needing to open an app. It uses NFC and Google said it will be accepted at over 700,000 stores in the US soon – there’s no word on other markets. You can choose which card to pay with across multiple devices and your card information won’t even be part of the transaction. Google said: “Instead we’ll use a virtual account number to represent your account information – providing you with an extra layer of security.” Android M Android Pay

ANDROID L VS ANDROID M: FINGERPRINT SCANNERS

Fingerprint scanners are already around on various devices but Android M has native fingerprint support which enhances Android Pay by allowing users to confirm a purchase with their fingerprint. Your fingerprint can be also used to unlock devices and make purchases on Google Play. “With new APIs in M, it’s easy for you to add fingerprint authorization to your app and have it work consistently across a range of devices and sensors,” said Google.

ANDROID L VS ANDROID M: APP PERMISSIONS

The permissions apps require in Android have always been something of a sore point, with many apps asking for way more than necessary and looking on the dodgy side. Well Android M is putting the control into the hands of the user. Apps will request certain permissions at runtime so you can choose whether to grant it or not but you can also control the individual permissions for each app in the settings. Android M App Permissions

ANDROID L VS ANDROID M: BATTERY LIFE

We always want better battery life and short of new battery technology software has a big part to play. In Android M, a feature called Doze will use sensors to detect when a device is not in use and put it into a deep sleep type mode. You’ll still receive important notifications and the like but it has the potential to double battery life which is what Google has seen running Android M on the Nexus 9.

ANDROID L VS ANDROID M: USB TYPE C

Although battery life should be better, you’ll need to charge your device eventually and Android M supports USB Type C which is reversible so you can’t plug it in the wrong way and could well be on the Nexus 5 2015. Even better is the fact it will charge your device quicker (three to five times) and you can use it to charge other devices if needs be. Android M Now on Tap

ANDROID L VS ANDROID M: NOW ON TAP

Google Now is helpful for all kinds of things within Android but it’s going to get better in Android M. Now on tap means you can press and hold the home button whenever you need help – Google Now will appear without you needing to navigate anywhere and will already know what you’re doing like trying to find the way to a restaurant.

SPECS

OUR VERDICT

With the same Material Design at the heart of Android M, it’s not a big OS update but the tweaks and new features are all welcome. Stay tuned for more on Android M as we approach the full launch.